Exploring Natural Sciences

Podcasts about Natural Sciences

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Episodes about Natural Sciences

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Maybe you’ve looked at the sky on a clear night and spotted the International Space Station, a tiny white dot gliding through the stars. Maybe it felt special, a rare glimpse of a human-made satellite in space. But what if you were to look up at the sky and see more visible satellites than stars? What if the Big Dipper and Orion were drowned out by  a satellite traffic jam, criss-crossing through space? A growing number of astronomers are sounding the alarm about such a possibility, even within the next decade. A new space race is already well underway. Commercial satellite traffic in low Earth orbit has skyrocketed in recent years, with more satellites launched into space than ever before. The majority of these satellites are owned and operated by a single company: Starlink. Featuring Samantha Lawler, Jonathan McDowell, Aaron Boley, and Roohi Dalal, with thanks to Edward Oughton.  SUPPORTOutside/In is made possible with listener support. Click here to become a sustaining member. Subscribe to our newsletter to get occasional emails about new show swag, call-outs for listener submissions, and other announcements.Follow Outside/In on Instagram or Twitter, or join our private discussion group on Facebook. LINKSHere’s a link to the most popular proceedings in the FCC docket, and a step-by-step guide for submitting your own comments (this guide was compiled for a previous filing by an advocacy group which includes Samantha Lawler).COMPASSE, or the Committee for the Protection of Astronomy and the Space Environment, also stays up-to-date on FCC procedures.In this episode, Nate and Justine looked at this 3D rendering of satellite constellations around the globe, including GPS and Starlink. Space Data Navigator has nice visualizations of the number of launches, satellites, and debris over time, which relies in part on Jonathan McDowell’s data. Aaron Boley’s article in Nature, “Satellite mega-constellations create risks in Low Earth Orbit, the atmosphere and on Earth.”A talk by Samantha Lawler about Kuiper belt objects and the challenges to astronomy posed by sharp increase in satellites. An open-access paper which found that internet from satellite mega-constellations could be up to 12-14 times more emission-intensive than terrestrial broadband.For more from Outside/In on the “earth-space environmental system,” check out our episode on property rights in airspace and space-space, this one on the element of aluminum, and an oldie-but-a-goodie on geoengineering.A piece on the cutting room floor: the risk that you’ll get hit by satellite debris falling back to Earth is quite low… but the risk that someone will get hit is rising. Here’s a global map of light pollution, and a tool to find dark sky sites near you.On the issue of orbital crowding, there have been a couple notable traffic jams in space. Last month, a decommissioned Russian satellite disintegrated in low Earth orbit, posing potential risks to astronauts on board the ISS. In 2019, an important weather-monitoring satellite had to dodge a Starlink satellite, a fuel-expensive maneuver. In 2021, Starlink and OneWeb debated what really happened when their satellites passed within 190 feet of each other in orbit. A note on space regulationOur episode did not cover all the groups regulating space. At a global level, this includes the UN’s International Telecommunication Union and the UN Office of Outer Space Affairs. Within the United States, the Office of Space Commerce also plays a role, in addition to the Federal Aviation Administration and the Federal Communications Commission CREDITSOutside/In host: Nate HegyiReported, produced, and mixed by Justine Paradis Edited by Taylor QuimbyOur team also includes Felix Poon. NHPR’s Director of Podcasts is Rebecca LavoieMusic in this episode came from Victor Lundberg, Lofive, Harbours & Oceans, Spiegelstadt, Curved Mirror, Silver Maple, Wave Saver, Cobby Costa, and From Now On.The blue whale calls were recorded by NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory.Outside/In is a production of New Hampshire Public Radio.
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Today's episode features Dr. Bryan Pijanowski, Professor of Soundscape Ecology in the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources at Purdue University, in Indiana. He is the author of "Principles of Soundscape Ecology: Discovering Our Sonic World," which was just released and is a definitive guide to the field of soundscape ecology, the topic of today's episode. Dr. Pijanowski is also the author of an influential BioScience article on the field. Learn more about soundscape ecology at the Center for Global Soundscapes, and be sure to check whether the IMAX film discussed in the interview is playing near you. 
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 It’s an all too familiar scenario to foresters…a new pest is introduced into another part of the range and slowly works its way to a forest near you. So it goes with the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) that was introduced into eastern North America over 70 years ago. HWA has not yet arrived in Wisconsin, but can we learn from the research and field experience of our colleagues in the east? Are there silvicultural approaches that can be used to make hemlock trees and stands more resilient, along with other integrated pest management approaches? Join us on this episode of SilviCast as we discuss these approaches with Bud Mayfield, Research Entomologist with the USFS Southern Research Station and Robert Jetton, Associate Professor at North Carolina State University.  To earn CEU/CFE credits, learn more, or interact with SilviCast, visit the uwsp.edu/SilviCast.
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In this episode of the award-winning Wildtalk Podcast, we talk to Greg Hochstetler about turtle conservation work, fly away with a discussion about the ring-billed gull, and we wrap up the episode with a chat about the Virginia opossum. Pete Kailing also stops in to talk about hunting and trapping opportunities and more that are available in the month of July. Episode Hosts: Rachel Lincoln and Eric HilliardProducer/editor: Eric HilliardAll things habitatMuskegon State Game Area mapSpotted turtleWood turtleMichigan Natural Features InventoryAll things feathersRing-billed gullAvian influenza infoEyes in the fieldAll things furVirginia opossumQuestions or comments about the show? Contact the DNR Wildlife Division at 517-284-9453 (WILD) or email dnr-wildlife@michigan.gov.
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As I write this, just a couple of days have passed since the Chang'e 6 sample return capsule touched down with its historic payload. The first sample of rock and soil from the far side of the moon touched down on Earth. This has the potential to unlock some of the secrets from the side of the moon that we never see from Earth, why is the lunar crust thicker? Why are there fewer 'seas' on the far side? And what lies beneath the lunar crust?All of this against the background of a surface operation out of direct communication from Earth. Incredible!Follow Cosmic Coffee Time on X for some special content      X.com/CosmicCoffTimeYou can request a topic for the show! Or even just say hi!We'd love to hear from you.Email us!cosmiccoffeetime@gmail.com
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Dr. Jenkins sits down with Michael Starkey, Founder and Executive Director of Save the Snakes. They begin the discussion by talking about Michael's path to conservation - it is an inspiring story that is somewhat different from most. They then delve into the work of Save the Snakes, focusing on conserving snakes around the world using a combination of conservation science, outreach, education, and community conservation. If you are interested in snake conservation, you will not want to miss this episode.Connect with Michael at Save the Snakes.  Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society.Shop Snake Talk merch.
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In this episode we uncover the terrifying true story of Dennis Rader, infamously known as the BTK Killer. For three decades, Rader eluded law enforcement while committing a series of brutal murders in Wichita, Kansas, taunting police and the public with cryptic messages and chilling clues. Dennis Rader led a double life, presenting himself as a devoted family man and active community member while harboring a dark, sadistic alter ego. Listeners will be taken through the harrowing details of Rader's crimes, from the gruesome crime scenes to the intricate forensic evidence that linked him to the murders as we discuss why he did this. Interested in learning more about when WTF releases new episodes, contests, and more? Make sure to give us a follow on:Facebook: @whattheforensicsInstagram: @whattheforenicsTwitter: @WTForensicsPodYouTube: @whattheforensicsFor more details about the hosts, episode details, sources, and images related to each episode, check out our website at http://www.whattheforensics.ca Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
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Happy Orca Action Month! We are celebrating all month long on the Whale Tales Podcast with four special episodes each highlighting a specific Orca (or OrcaS) from around the world with a truly terrific tale. Today we are wrapping things up with the currently very famous Gladis-or should we say Gladises? Show Notes: – Killer whales […]
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In the final episode of our fourth season, Steve and Jennifer welcome Travis Loop to Tap Talk to discuss how to use solutions-focused journalism and storytelling to address our various water problems. Travis is the founder of waterloop, a nonprofit media outlet exploring the progress and successes in tackling water challenges in the United States through podcasts, videos, and social media content. Visit drinkingwaterpodcast.org to learn more and find the full show notes for this episode!
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Billy talked with author Scott Weidensaul about the wonders of bird migration and how urbanite humans can make their city habitats better for avian visitors. Topics include shorebirds, songbirds, raptors, outdoor cats, dogs, urban parks, window collisions, artificial light at … Continue reading →