Exploring Natural Sciences

Podcasts about Natural Sciences

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Episodes about Natural Sciences

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For humans, roads epitomize freedom. For wildlife, it’s a different story: a million animals are killed by cars every day in the US alone.How did our infrastructure turn so deadly? And what are people trying to do about it?In this episode, we look at how two very different species are impacted by roads. Along the way, we visit a turtle rescue clinic, hear about a celebrity cougar that was trapped in the Hollywood Hills, and find out what it took to fund what will soon be the world’s largest wildlife bridge.Featuring Ben Goldfarb, Alexxia Bell, Natasha Nowick, and Michaela Conder. SUPPORTOutside/In is made possible with listener support. Click here to become a sustaining member of Outside/In. Talk to us! Follow Outside/In on Instagram or Twitter, or discuss the show in our private listener group on Facebook.  LINKSFrom bears to badgers, and crocodiles in Florida to salamanders in Vermont – check out these videos of wildlife crossings in action across the country. (NYTimes)Check out Crossings: How Road Ecology is Shaping the Future of Our Planet, by Ben Goldfarb.Read more about The Turtle Rescue League in Of Time and Turtles: Mending the World, Shell by Shattered Shell, by Sy Montgomery.Engross yourself in the stories of the National Park Service’s Puma Profiles of the Santa Monica Mountains. CREDITSHost: Nate HegyiReported, produced, and mixed by Felix Poon.Edited by Taylor Quimby.Our team also includes Justine Paradis.Rebecca Lavoie is our Executive Producer.Music for this episode by Jay Varton, Rand Aldo, and Blue Dot Sessions.Theme music by Breakmaster Cylinder.Outside/In is a production of New Hampshire Public Radio.
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Almond grower and Almond Board of California Director Christine Gemperle discusses how she finds balance between conventional farming approaches and ecological processes. She also shares her early experiences with whole orchard recycling, new irrigation systems, cover crops and habitat for pollinators, including monarch butterflies.Gemperle and her brother Erich started their almond operation in 1997, which includes 135 acres on two farms: one near Ceres and the other in the Newman area. The brother-sister partners are second generation central valley farmers.“I don't know that people understand how much food security is dependent on California agriculture. It's so important globally that we be able to continue to farm.” - Christine GemperleIn Today’s episode:Meet Christine Gemperle of Gemperle OrchardsDiscover how Gemperle has incorporated practices such as whole orchard recycling, cover crops and pollinator habitat into her operationUnderstand how new approaches and new irrigation technologies are making California farms more efficient and resilientThe Almond Journey Podcast is brought to you by the Almond Board of California. This show explores how growers, handlers, and other stakeholders are making things work in their operations to drive the almond industry forward. Host Tim Hammerich visits with leaders throughout the Central Valley of California and beyond who are finding innovative ways to improve their operations, connect with their communities, and advance the almond industry.ABC recognizes the diverse makeup of the California almond industry and values contributions offered by its growers, handlers, and allied industry members. However, the opinions, services and products discussed in existing and future podcast episodes are by no means an endorsement or recommendation from ABC. The Almond Journey podcast is not an appropriate venue to express opinions on national, state, local or industry politics. As a Federal Marketing Order, the Almond Board of California is prohibited from lobbying or advocating on legislative issues, as well as setting field and market prices.
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Why should more conservationists learn to study people?   To better understand them as individuals, communities and societies, alongside their complex behaviours and interactions.  This is what today’s podcast is all about, and it’s something termed social science.  Here to discuss the power of social science for conservation is today’s guest Dr Rebecca Jefferson.  Rebecca runs Human Nature, a social enterprise which seeks to empower conservationists to have a more positive impact on the planet through training, collaboration and support.  We talk about why social science is important for conservationists, how it can be used to tackle wildlife declines.   We also discuss the benefits of people with different disciplines and backgrounds working in partnerships to have better outcomes in conservation projects.  Rebecca also shares her journey in setting up a business with impact at its core, along with her advice for others who might be seeking to follow in her footsteps.  It’s a people-partnering, social-sciencing, conservation pod-chat.  Enjoy. 
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In the 10th episode of our series of podcasts dedicated to the new EU Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive, CSRD, Intertek VP of Innovation at Intertek Business Assurance, Simona Romanoschi meets with Sonia Zugel, CEO & Founder of ESG Playbook to discuss the challenges companies are faced with in gathering the required data covering ES and G, and tips to prepare their first CSRD report submission. Speakers:Simona Romanoschi - VP of Innovation at Intertek Business AssuranceSonia Zugel - CEO & Founder of ESG PlaybookFollow us on- Intertek's Assurance In Action || Twitter || LinkedIn.
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Dr. Jenkins sits down with Matt Buehler, a Ph.D. Candidate studying indigo snake genetics. They begin with how Matt found himself working with indigo snakes and cover some interesting steps in his career including studying Sea Kraits. They start the discussion of indigo snake genetics by talking about what has already been done, including a study using mitochondrial data that showed there are two clades of Eastern Indigo Snakes and a second study showing that there is gene flow between the clades. They talk about Matt’s research, including looking at population structure of indigo snakes and understanding the indigo snake genome. The results from all these studies are important for developing reintroduction strategies.Connect with Matt on his website.Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society.Shop Snake Talk merch.
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast? This Week: Interview W/Natalia Reagan, Glowing Monkeys, Editing Cholesterol, Seawater Soup, Sperm Sorrow, Ovarian Teeth, Social Sickness, Sober Thoughts, Science Questions, And Much More! Become a Patron! Check out the full unedited episode of our science podcast on YouTube or Twitch. And, remember that you can […] The post 15 November, 2023 – Episode 951 – Should Science Monkey Around? appeared first on This Week in Science - The Kickass Science Podcast.
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In this compelling episode of "Redefine & Thrive," Kohdi Rayne shatters the myths surrounding addiction, offering a fresh perspective on the journey to sobriety. Join us as we delve into the unspoken truths of addiction, the underestimated power of the mind, and the essential role of physical well-being. Get inspired by stories of transformation and the innovative strategies from Beyond Sober and Unlabeled Recovery that equip individuals with the tools to not just survive, but thrive. This episode is an invitation to redefine your life and embrace the holistic path to recovery.
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In this episode of the Wildtalk Podcast, we talk to Jesse Lincoln from Michigan Natural Features Inventory about all things habitat, fly away with a discussion about bird migration and die-offs from window collisions, and we wrap up the episode with a chat about what is perhaps Michigan’s most iconic fall mammal, the white-tailed deer.                Episode Hosts: Rachel Leightner and Eric HilliardProducer/editor: Eric HilliardAll things habitatMichigan Natural Features Inventory (MNFI)Allegan State Game Area map (PDF)All things feathersMerlin appAll things furMichigan.gov/DeerQuestions or comments about the show? Contact the DNR Wildlife Division at 517-284-9453 (WILD) or email dnr-wildlife@michigan.gov.
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Wow, it’s already episode 4! Joining us from Eastern Canada is Brian Maloney of Ferme Brylee. Brian operates a beef and sheep farm with a direct to consumer shop in Quebec, along side his wife Lise and his daughter Kim. Brian is a self admitted “Free Thinker”, and regularly puts out his own musings in the form of his “Saturday Ruminations” (which you can check out on his Facebook page).   Join us for some interesting conversation whilst we discuss grazing, value chains, knowledge transfer, creative thinking and lots of other tid bits!   Brians Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brian.maloney.142?mibextid=LQQJ4d   Ferme Brylee Instagram: https://instagram.com/bryleefarms?igshid=MzRlODBiNWFlZA==   Thanks, as always, to our sponsors. https://mfga.net/      
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We invited Diana Wall to talk with us about "Soils in the Antarctic". How do you sample under extreme cold? What organisms can survive there in the soil? This episode will tell you! So(i)lid Science - the podcast about science and people with a certain focus on soils. Folge direkt herunterladen